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math calculations with diabetes insulin

Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx:
humalog U-100 kwik pen
box of 5
30 units daily
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The doctor has prescribed Humalog KwikPen.
Humalog is an injectable, fast-acting insulin.
The sealed box has five 3mL prefilled pens. So, the box has 5 * 3 = 15 mL
The doctor wants the pharmacist to dispense one box of 5 pens. In other words, the pharmacist will dispense one box.
So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 15 mL
The sig says: inject 30 units subcutaneously daily
Now, we need to convert 30 units into mL
We know that the ratio is 1mL/100U
Now, let's set up a proportion using 30U and 1mL/100U to solve for x:
x / 30 units = 1 mL / 100 units
Let's cross-multiply:
(x)(100U) = (30U)(1mL)
(x)(100U) = (30U)mL
Divide both sides by 100U to isolate x:
x = (30U / 100U)mL
x = (30 / 100)mL
x = 0.3 mL
So, the patient injects 0.3 mL daily. Then, the total days supply will be 15mL divided by 0.3mL which is 50 days.
So, the total days supply is 50 days.
Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx:
Humalog 75/25
30U sq am/pm
#3 vials
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The doctor has prescribed 3 vials of Humalog Mix 75/25
Each vial of Humalog Mix has 10 mL of insulin
1 vial = 10 mL and then 3 vials = 30 mL
So, the total quantity to be dispensed will be 30 mL
The sig says: inject 30 units subcutaneously in the morning and in the evening
In other words, the patient will inject 60 units per day.
Now, we need to convert 60 units into mL
We know that the ratio is 1mL/100U
x / 60U = 1mL / 100U
x = (60 * 1) / 100
x = 0.6 mL
So, the patient will inject 0.6 mL per day.
Now, the total days supply will be 30mL divided by 0.6mL which is 50 days.
Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx:
Levemir insulin
qty: 1
inj 60 units sc qd
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The doctor has prescribed the brand-name drug Levemir insulin.
The doctor wants the pharmacist to dispense one vial.
One vial has 10 mL of insulin. So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 10mL
The sig says: inject 60 units subcutaneously every day
The ratio for the insulin is 1 mL per 100 units.
We need to convert 60 units into mL
x / 60 U = 1 mL / 100 U
x = (60U * 1mL) / 100U
x = 60 / 100
x = 0.6 mL
In turn, the patient will use 0.6 mL per day.
Now, the total days supply will be 10 mL divided by 0.6 mL which is 16 days.
Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx:
Levemir flexpen
#15 mL
70 U qd
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The doctor has prescribed Levemir flexpen injection (U-100) 5X3mL prefilled pens. The package has 5 pens and each pen has 3mL and, thus, we can say the package has 15mL of insulin.
The total quantity to be dispensed is 15 mL as stated by the doctor.
The sig says: inject 70 units subcutaneously every day
Now, we need to convert 70 units into mL
Notice that U-100 means 100 units of insulin per 1 mL, that is, 1 mL per 100 units.
x / 70 U = 1 mL / 100 U
x = (70 U * 1 mL) / 100 U
x = 0.7 mL
The patient injects 0.7 mL daily.
So, the total days supply will be 15 divided by 0.7 which is 21 days.
Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following Rx:
Levemir pen x 3 mon
sig: 60 units daily
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The doctor has prescribed Levemir flexpen injection (U-100) 5X3mL prefilled pens. So, the sealed package has 15mL of insulin.
The doctor wants the pharmacist to dispense enough insulin for 3 months, that is, for 90 days.
So, the total days supply is 90 days as stated by the doctor.
The sig says: inject 60 units subcutaneously daily
Now, we need to convert 60 units into mL
U-100 means 100 units of insulin per 1 mL, that is, 1 mL per 100 units.
x / 60 U = 1 mL / 100 U
x = (60 U * 1 mL) / 100 U
x = 0.6 mL
The patient will inject 0.6 mL daily.
The doctor says for the pharmacist to dispense enough insulin for 90 days.
Then, the patient will use 0.6 * 90 which is 54 mL
But, the total quantity can not be 54 mL. The total quantity will have to be 60mL because the sealed package has 15mL of insulin.
Therefore, if 1 package has 15 mL, then 4 packages will have 60 mL
So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 60 mL
But, the insurance company may not want to pay for 60 mL all at once, that is, the insurance company may not want to pay for 4 packages at the same time. The insurance company may make the patient pick up one package at a time.
In this case, the total quantity dispensed would be 15mL, but the total quantity prescribed would be 60mL
The total days supply would be 15mL divided by 0.6mL which is 25 days.
The patient will have to come back every 25 days in order to pick up 15mL, that is, to pick up one package every 25 days.
Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following drug:
novolin 70/30
30 units sq bid
disp: 1 month
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The total days supply is 30 days as stated by the doctor.
The sig says: inject 30 units subcutaneously twice daily
We need to convert 30 units into mL
The ratio is 1 mL per 100 units
x / 30U = 1mL / 100U
x = 0.3 mL
So, the patient injects 0.3 mL twice daily, that is, the patient injects 0.6mL daily.
The total quantity will be 0.6 mL * 30 days which is 18 mL
But, one bottle of novolin has 10 mL of insulin. So, the pharmacist will have to dispense 2 bottles, that is, 20mL
So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 20 mL
It is worth noting that Novolin insulin is an over-the-counter insulin. The patient does not need a prescription in order to get it.
If the insurance company is going to be billed for Novolin insulin, then a prescription from the doctor is required. But, if the patient is just paying with cash, then the patient does not need a prescription from the doctor.
Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following drug:
Novolin R 10 mL
10U qam and 10U qhs
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The doctor has prescribed Novolin R (U-100) which is a regular human insulin injection. The vial has 10mL
The total quantity to be dispensed is 10 mL as stated by the doctor.
The sig says: inject 10 units subcutaneously in the morning and 10 units at bedtime
The patient will inject 20 units per day. Now, we need to convert 20 units into milliliters.
We know that the ratio is 100 units per mL, that is, 1 mL per 100 units
x / 20 U = 1 mL / 100 U
x = (20 U * 1 mL) / 100 U
x = 20 mL / 100
x = 0.2 mL
So, the patient will inject 0.2 mL per day
The total days supply will be 10mL divided by 0.2mL which is 50 days.
It is worth noting that Novolin insulin is an over-the-counter insulin. The patient does not need a prescription in order to get it.
If the insurance company is going to be billed for Novolin insulin, then a prescription from the doctor is required. But, if the patient is just paying with cash, then the patient does not need a prescription from the doctor.
Calculate the total quantity and the total days supply for the following drug:
NPH
80U qhs
3 mos
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NPH means N insulin. It can be either Humulin N or Novolin N
The sig says: inject 80 units at bedtime subcutaneously
Now, we need to convert 80 units (U) into milliliters (mL)
The ratio of insulin is 100U/mL
x / 80 U = 1 mL / 100 U
x = (80 U * 1 mL) / 100 U
x = 0.8 mL
So, the patient will inject 0.8 mL per day.
The days supply is 90 days as stated by the doctor.
The quantity for 3 months will be 0.8 x 90 which is 72 mL
But, we have to round the quantity from 72mL to 80mL because one vial of N insulin has 10mL.
So, the total quantity to be dispensed is 80 mL
In addition, if 1 bottle has 10 mL, then 8 bottles have 80 mL
In this case, the pharmacist will dispense 8 vials of 10mL each.
It is worth noting that both Novolin insulin and Humulin insulin are an over-the-counter insulin. The patient does not need a prescription in order to get them.





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2006